Events, news, and opportunities

Events coming up:

Spring 2014 Urban Studies Program Planning Meeting
 
Thursday, 4/10 at 6 PM
Lehman Hall 421
Barnard campus
 
The Barnard–Columbia Urban Studies program enables students to explore and understand the urban experience in all of its richness and complexity.
 
Please join us for our Spring 2014 informational meeting, where we will give a general overview of the courses being offered next term, answer questions about our curricular requirements, and discuss the unique opportunities that the Barnard–Columbia Urban Studies program has to offer.
 
All Urban Studies majors, faculty members, and prospective students are invited to attend.
 
Pizza and drinks will be served.
 
 
 
URBAN STUDIES FILM SERIES 2014
Thursday, 4/17 at 6 PM
Sloate Media Center
Lehman Hall 302
 
Aching with subdued passion and romantic melancholy, In the Mood for Love is a period piece set in 1962 Hong Kong about two next-door neighbors flirting with the idea of an affair. Li-zhen (Maggie Cheung) works as a secretary while her husband goes on long business trips to Japan. Across the hall, Chow (Tony Leung Chiu-wai) is a newspaper editor whose wife is also frequently out of town. The two strike up a cordial, politely distant friendship, but a series of events pull them closer and closer together as the prospect of infidelity looms in the distance. Elegant and lyrical without being stuffy or stiff, this understated period drama premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2000 and was nominated for the Palme d'Or.
 
Free screening! All Columbia and Barnard students are invited. No RSVP necessary; just show up.
 
 
Urban Studies Senior Party
Tuesday 4/29 at 6 PM
Sulzberger Tower (17th Floor), Barnard campus
 
The Barnard–Columbia Urban Studies program invites you to a festive celebration in honor of our graduating seniors.
 
Please join us as we toast the extraordinary achievements and promising futures of the Urban Studies class of 2014.
 
 
Zoning Before Zoning // Raising The Bar 2014
Profs. Gergely Baics & Leah Meisterlin
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
8:00 PM – 9:30 PM
 
What was the spatial order of the 19th century city? And how did America’s first metropolis develop without systematic land-use regulations? Before zoning, New York’s built environment was largely unregulated, with property owners finding minimal restrictions to their choices to develop urban land. But the city made by the “invisible hand” had its own spatial order, with commerce, industry and residential spaces competing and coexisting, creating a patchwork of single and mixed-use areas, zones of crowding and density. In this talk, using digital mapping analysis based on data made available by the New York Public Library, Baics and Meisterlin will take us to mid-19th century New York to get a picture of how the space of the metropolis was organized and developed before zoning.
 
Perdition (Age 21+)
692 10th Avenue
New York, NY 10019, USA
 

 

 

Previously this academic year

West Side Story

Wednesday, 9/25 at 7 PM
304 Barnard Hall
 
A modern take on Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, this classic musical is an urban love story set within the context of rival street gangs and violent racial animosity. Tony and Maria, two star-crossed youths living in the tenements of 1950s New York City, meet and fall in love despite being on different sides of a bitter turf war. Winner of 10 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, West Side Story is a surprisingly fresh and timeless film 52 years after its release, and remains a towering achievement in American cinema history.
 
Annie Hall
Thursday 11/21 at 7 PM
304 Barnard Hall
 
"Just about everyone's favorite Woody Allen movie” — Roger Ebert, The Chicago Sun-Times, 2002
 
One of the most iconic romantic comedies in American cinema, Annie Hall (1977) is the story of a failed relationship between a stand-up comedian (Woody Allen) and aspiring singer (Diane Keaton) who meet in New York City and maintain a strong, lasting affection for one another, despite their many fights, breakups, quirks, neuroses, and deep incompatibilities as a couple. Winner of four Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actress, Annie Hall is a sustained meditation on the nature of love itself — a force that the film deems "irrational and crazy and absurd," but ultimately essential, even after it fades.
 

Amélie

Thursday, 3/6 at 6 PM
The Diana Center, Room 504, Barnard campus
 
The fanciful, visually arresting Amélie is a feel-good comedy about a café waitress in Montmarte (played by Audrey Tautou) who decides to change the lives of the people around her through complex schemes and elaborate good deeds. She falls in love with a similarly quirky man (Mathieu Kassovitz) who collects discarded pictures from photo booths — but instead of asking him out directly, she sets him on a wild treasure hunt across Paris. The film mixes a light tone with sardonic humor but is ultimately a rumination on social reticence and loss, as well as the limits of whimsy and playfulness.
 
Amélie received five Academy Award nominations in 2001 for Best Sound, Best Cinematography, Best Art Design, Best Screenplay, and Best Foreign Film.

 

 
Study Abroad Fair

Friday 9/27 from 12:30 PM to 3:30 PM
Roone Arledge Auditorium, Lerner Hall
Sponsored by Columbia's Office of Global Programs and Barnard's Office of International Programs

For the Public Good: Public Accountability in NYC
A panel with Elizabeth Blackmar, Aaron Pallas, and J. Phillip Thompson

Thursday, 11/7, 2013 at 7 PM
Julius S. Held Auditorium, 304 Barnard Hall

New York City is currently considering selling schools, libraries, parks, and low-income housing to private corporations. Public funds paid not only for these buildings and spaces, but also for the services that are provided in them. Many feel that city officials have shown little accountability to public interests in the making of these decisions. What happens when public goods are not managed in transparent ways? What happens to democratic accountability when public goods come under private management? How does access to these resources serve the public good? Elizabeth Blackmar, professor of social and urban history at Columbia University; Aaron Pallas, professor of sociology and education at Teachers College; and J. Phillip Thomson, professor of political science and urban planning at MIT, tackle these questions in this provocative look at the consequences of privitization.

 

Fall 2013 Program Planning Meeting

Thursday, 11/14 at 4 PM
The Diana Center, Room 504 (Barnard campus)

The Barnard–Columbia Urban Studies program enables students to explore and understand the urban experience in all of its richness and complexity.

Please join us for our Fall 2013 informational meeting, where we will give a general overview of the courses being offered next term, answer questions about our curricular requirements, and discuss the unique opportunities that the Barnard–Columbia Urban Studies program has to offer.

All Urban Studies majors, faculty members, and prospective students are invited to attend. Pizza and drinks will be served.

 

Kenneth Cole Community Engagement Fellowship

Columbia College sophomores and juniors are encouraged to consider applying for the Kenneth Cole Community Engagement Program. This exciting and innovative program will empower students with the skills necessary to implement effective community problem solving and change. After the completion of a required academic course and program series in the spring semester, the program culminates in a paid summer internship project within a local organization wherein Kenneth Cole Fellows will work with community partners to build community capacity, address pressing local problems, encourage social action, and strengthen the local community. The program will also provide students with summer housing.  Visit the program web site to apply or learn more.